Trust and reputations

We are supposed to be short of trust and reputations are certainly under constant and vicious attack. We need to see where trust really does lie, and whether we ought to recalibrate our assessment of reputations.

Categories: Political spin / Trust and reputations

22 June 2012

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Cameron made his own PR tax trap…

When comedian Ken Dodd was put in the dock for stashing in excess of three hundred thousand pounds in shoeboxes and suitcases, and placing more untaxed money in twenty offshore accounts, he claimed: “the money was the savings from my taxed income.” Dodd’s hapless losing prosecutor was Brian Leveson QC. So what to make of the Jimmy Carr affair? Read on ›

Categories: PR issues / Trust and reputations

16 January 2012

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For PR’s reputation: let’s define ourselves candidly

Why are so many PR pros embarrassed by what they do for a living? This normally hidden angst becomes transparent whenever they attempt to define the essence of our trade. Nothing illustrates this better than the four supposedly modern definitions of PR being discussed by PRSA and CPRS, all of which share one fundamental flaw: evasiveness about what PR is really about. Read on ›

Categories: Crisis management / Trust and reputations / Zurich

20 June 2011

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How pat PR sells clients short in a crisis

I’m sitting lakeside near Zurich after a swim, and I surf on my friend’s handheld electronic thingamajig. It lands me on Paul Holmes’s eponymous Report. There I click on a video by Richard Levick, CEO of Levick Strategic Communications. He’s discussing three common mistakes that companies and countries make when faced with a crisis. Oops, and he then makes four classic PR errors himself. Read on ›

Posted by Gavin Carter

Categories: Gavin Carter / Guest Writers / Political spin / Trust and reputations

6 June 2011

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Obama’s ratings: PR or political luck?

The president of the United States presides over a sluggish economy. Unemployment is increasing, gas prices are high and his administration’s various initiatives to boost the depressed housing market – a key economic influence – have all failed. Consumer and business confidence remain low and economists are downgrading growth forecasts. Yet Barack Obama’s approval ratings remain above 40 per cent and he seems as popular in Europe as his predecessor was reviled. Is this simply down to public relations? Read on ›